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9:2Beaver Architectural Ironmongery LtdTechnical NotesAncillary ProductsKey switchesElectric switches operated by a standard key. Available in momentary, maintained and SPDT types.Micro switchNormally referred to in lockcases and electronic strikes, these allow for the testing of the lock bolt position.RelaysA relay is an electrically operated switch, which can in its normal position be either open or closedPower suppliesThese convert the mains AC current to DC and also reduce the voltage to either 12V or 24V which is a requirement for all of our electronic locking. Generally all power supplies should also be bought with a battery back up to ensure that in the event of a power failure the doors will continue locking.The Salto Access Control SystemSalto Virtual Network (SVN)This is a truly unique concept, unlike traditional systems where the database of users is held in the handle set so that adding/changing/deleting a user's access rights or collecting audit trails always required a trip to the door. The Salto handle sets communicate with the computer using the keycards as data transporters: this includes personal audit trails, battery status reports and carrying a cancelled keycard list which is transferred to each lock that the user visits. The system is "transparent" to the user as the wall readers double as "hotspots", updating keycard access privileges and uploading the user audit trail and battery status report to the central database from the keycard. The concept has in fact redefined true access control performance for battery powered locks at just a fraction of the cost of a traditional access control system.True flexibilityBeing lockcase independent the Salto System allows for the fitting of its units to virtually any type of lock including multipoint types. This gives incredible advantages over a traditional system, as it is a case of simply taking off a mechanical handle set and refitting the Salto unit, making it ideal for refurbishment and new build. Because of its narrow profile Salto will fit onto aluminium, PVCu, timber, steel, and glass doors.Complete access control platformNot only do Salto manufacture their handle sets and wall readers, but for complete security integration there are electronic cylinders, locker locks, and smart energy management units both off and on line all operated by the same keycards.Fixing brackets for door magnetsA variety of brackets may be supplied to allow magnets to be fitted to different door and frame arrangements.MagnetArmatureZ BracketSpreaderPlateMagnetArmatureTPlateMagnetArmatureLPlateMagnetArmature

Beaver Architectural Ironmongery Ltd9:3Technical NotesAC (Alternating Current)Term which refers to the voltage from a transformer or mains supply.AmpMeasurement for the flow rate of electrical current for an electrical device. Smaller amounts below 1 amp are quoted in milliamps (mA).ANSIAmerican National Standards Institute. Ensures mortice electric release dimensions for faceplate and side lip are the same for every version.Anti Tamper ScrewScrew which has a non-standard head (for example Hex or Torx drive head).Back EMFElectrical surge which is produced from the coil of an electric release or electromagnetic lock. Can cause an access control system to crash.Battery BackupRechargeable battery which fits into a DC power supply (PSU) to provide power for a limited period during a power failure.CurrentElectricity flows in two ways; either in alternating current or AC or in direct current or DC. Typically AC would be used at home to power your oven or toaster, whereas DC normally incorporates a power supply to step down the voltage and convert mains AC to DC.Current DrawAmount of electrical current which is required to operate an electronic locking device or system. Usually measured in amps or milliamps.DC (Direct Current)Term which refers to the voltage from a power supply unit (PSU).Dual VoltageCan be set to work on two different voltages, for example 12 V or 24 V.Fail Locked / Fail SecureMeans an electric locking device will remain locked in a power failure.Fail Unlocked / Fail SafeMeans an electric locking device wil be unlocked in a power failure. By default electronic magnets fail unlocked.Hall Effect MonitoringRelay circuit which indicates correct alignment of the armature plate on an electromagnetic lock.Holding ForceAmount of pressure which can be applied to an electric locking device before it will release/unlock. Usually shown in kilograms (kg).MaintainedTerm used for switches - means the switch will remain in either the On or Off position when operated. Also known asalternate switches.MomentaryTerm used for switches - means the switch will change from On to Off only while the switch is pressed/turned.MonitoredShows the status of an electric locking device by signalling to an access control system or indication panel that the device is locked or unlocked.SPDT (Single Pole Double Throw)Term used for switches - means the switch can be on in both positions switching on a separate device in each case. Also known as changeover switches.VoltageMeasurement of the energy available to drive the flow of electrical current.Terminology